Overcoming Barriers in Preparing Law Students for Real-World Practice
Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution, Symposium 2012, October 19, 2012

Keynote Speaker

Lisa Kloppenberg

Lisa Kloppenberg
Professor of Law
University of Dayton School of Law

Lisa Kloppenberg served as dean of the University of Dayton School of Law from 2001 to 2011.  She is a widely published expert in constitutional law and an advocate of appropriate dispute resolution.  As the dean, she championed curricular reform, bringing national recognition for the way the law school rethought legal education.  She led successful efforts to diversify the faculty, reignited a greater spirit of service in students, and established the first accelerated five-semester law degree in the nation.  She also created the position of dean of students, putting an emphasis on student services.  In addition, the law school established graduate degree programs in intellectual property and technology law.  In 2006, University of Dayton School of Law was recognized by the International Institute for Conflict Prevention and Resolution for its emphasis on appropriate dispute resolution, and in 2007, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching invited Dayton and a handful of other universities – including Harvard, Stanford and Georgetown – to examine how American law schools prepare lawyers and to make reform recommendations.

Before going to Dayton, Kloppenberg was a faculty member at the University of Oregon School of Law for nearly 10 years, where she founded and directed the school’s Appropriate Dispute Resolution Program.  Before teaching, she was an attorney with Kaye, Scholer, Fierman, Hays & Handler in Washington, D.C., for four years where she was involved with litigation, arbitration and mediation of a variety of domestic and international disputes.  She also served as a pro bono mediator for a federal court and performed pro bono work for a number of public interest organizations including the Guatemala Human Rights Commission, USA.  Kloppenberg graduated from the University of Southern California Law Center, where she was the editor-in-chief of the Southern California Law Review.  After graduation, she clerked for Judge Dorothy Wright Nelson of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.


Presenters

Clark D. Cunningham

Clark D. Cunningham
W. Lee Burge Professor of Law & Ethics
Georgia State University College of Law

Clark Cunningham has written and consulted extensively on legal practice and reform of legal education in the US and around the world.  He is the director of the National Institute for Teaching Ethics & Professionalism, a consortium of legal ethics centers at six universities, as well as the director of the Effective Lawyer-Client Communication Project, an international collaboration of law teachers, lawyers and social scientists.  He is a vice-chair of the Academic and Professional Development Committee of the International Bar Association; from 2007-2008 he served as the Convenor of the Steering Committee of the Global Alliance for Justice Education, an international organization of over 700 law teachers, lawyers, and leaders of non-governmental organizations from more than 50 countries. As an international member of the Expert Advisory Group for the Learning and Teaching Standards Project-Law of the Australian Learning & Teaching Council, he played a major role in developing newly adopted learning outcomes for ethics and professional judgment at Australian law schools. He is one of the few Americans admitted to membership of the world’s oldest bar association, The Society of Writers to Her Majesty's Signet, in recognition of his work on teaching and assessing client relationship skills in Great Britain.  

Cunningham has published over 30 articles, essays and book chapters, including publications in the Harvard Law Review, Yale Law Journal, University of Michigan Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal, and Cornell Law Review, and is a winner of the Annual Scholarly Paper Award from the Association of American Law Schools. He has been a visiting scholar at the Indian Law Institute, Sichuan University (China), the University of Sydney (Australia), University of Palermo (Argentina), and the National Law School of India.  Prior to his academic career, he was an active public interest lawyer.  He has litigated federal class action law suits, argued before the Missouri Supreme Court and the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and authored amicus briefs filed in the Michigan Supreme Court and the U.S. Supreme Court. He has also served as an expert witness on legal ethics in a number of major cases in which his testimony led to decisions against some of the nation’s largest law firms. Prior to his appointment as the inaugural Burge Chair at Georgia State, he was a member of the law faculties of the University of Michigan (1987-89) and Washington University in St. Louis (1989-2002).



Barbara Glesner Fines

Barbara Glesner Fines
Rubey M. Hulen Professor of Law
Associate Dean for Faculty Development
University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law

Barbara Glesner Fines has taught at the University of Missouri-Kansas City since 1986. She teaches courses on professional responsibility, family violence, divorce process, and a seminar in ethical issues in the representation of families and children.  She has presented in a wide range of programs related to teaching and learning in law schools and has written a good deal about legal education and professional identity, particularly in the context of family law.  Her recent publications include Ethical Issues in the Representation of Families (2010); Professional Responsibility: Context and Practice (2012); “Teaching with Small Groups; Integrating Interviewing Skills into the Classroom Curriculum” in Teaching the Law School Curriculum II (2011); “Fifty Years of Family Law Practice -- The Evolving Role of The Family Law Attorney,” 24 Journal of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers 601 (2011); “Lessons Learned About Classroom Teaching from Authoring Computer-Assisted Instruction Lessons,” 38  William Mitchell Law Review 1094 (2012); “Family Law Education Reform: Progress and Innovation,”49 Family Court Review 675 (2011); “Caring, Competence  and  the Family  Law  Attorney,” 75 UMKC  Law Review 965 (2007) (with Cathy Madsen).

Glesner has held leadership positions in many organizations devoted to legal education, including the AALS Section on Teaching Methods (chair 2012-13); the AALS Section on Professional Responsibility (secretary 2012-13); the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction (board of directors, 1998-2005; president 2002-2005; editorial board 1998 to date); Institute for Law School Teaching and Learning (advisory board 2003-to date); and as an author in the Best Practices in Legal Education Blog.  She received her law degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her masters of laws degree from Yale Law School.



David M. Moss

David M. Moss
Associate Professor
University of Connecticut Teaching Fellow
University of Connecticut Neag School of Education

David Moss specializes in curriculum studies with research focusing on culturally responsive teaching, global education, and environmental literacy.  He has authored over 60 articles, book chapters, and reviews on such topics as interdisciplinary education, international teacher education, and philosophy of science. His books include Reforming Legal Education: Law Schools at the Crossroads, Critical Essays on Resistance in Education, Interdisciplinary Education in an Age of Assessment, Portrait of a Profession: Teachers and Teaching in the 21st Century, and Beyond the Boundaries: A Transdisciplinary Approach to Learning and Teaching. 

Moss has served as a keynote and featured speaker at scholarly societies, universities, and national and international conferences, including the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education, Association of International Educators, Science Education at the Crossroads, and the New England Philosophy of Education Society.  He has extensive K-16 curriculum development and assessment experience on projects funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.  He has directed a teacher education internship-based study abroad program in London for more than a dozen years.  He earned his PhD from the University of New Hampshire and completed his undergraduate work at Alfred University.


Hon. Solomon Oliver, Jr.

Hon. Solomon Oliver, Jr.
Chief Judge
U.S. District Court, Northern District of Ohio

Judge Solomon Oliver Jr. was appointed to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio by President Clinton on May 9, 1994.  He has served as Chief Judge of that court since June 1, 2010.  He previously served as a member of the Judicial Conference of the United States and currently serves on its Advisory Committee on Civil Rules.  He was born in Bessemer, Ala., and attended the segregated public schools there.  He graduated from the College of Wooster with honors in 1969, majoring in philosophy and political science.  He received a JD degree from New York University in 1972, and a master's degree in political science from Case Western Reserve University in 1974.  Oliver served as assistant professor of political science at the College of Wooster from 1972 to 1975.  From 1975 to 1976, he served as a law clerk to the late Judge William H. Hastie of the U.S. Third Circuit Court of Appeals.  From 1976 to 1982, he served as an assistant U.S. attorney in Cleveland.  From 1978 to 1982, he was chief of the Civil Section of the United States Attorney’s Office and became chief of appellate litigation in 1982. 

Oliver joined the faculty of the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law of Cleveland State University in 1982 and served as associate dean of faculty and administration from 1991 to 1994.  He has served as secretary to the Council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar and currently serves as vice chair of the Council.  He also has co-chaired the ABA Litigation Section’s Minority Trial Lawyer Committee.  He has written articles and lectured on a wide range of topics at colleges and universities, at continuing legal education seminars and at judicial conferences.  One of his most recent publications is a chapter, “Summary Judgment,” in a six-volume treatise, Business and Commercial Litigation in Federal Courts.  He has received various awards, including the Distinguished Alumni Award from the College of Wooster and the Distinguished Alumni Award from New York University Black, Latino, Asian Pacific American Law Alumni Association.  Oliver is a member of the American Law Institute, the American Bar Foundation, and the Board of Trustees of the College of Wooster.


John R. Phillips

John R. Phillips
Partner, Husch Blackwell LLP
Chair, ABA Section of Dispute Resolution

John Phillips has been managing partner of Husch Blackwell, LLP, a Midwest law firm with which he has practiced in the areas of alternative dispute resolution, labor and employment, commercial litigation and health care for over 39 years.  He has served as special master for the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Missouri in Klein et al. v. Kansas City of Missouri Firefighters (sexual harassment class action) and for the District of Kansas in Williams v. Sprint (age collective action).  He is a member of the Large Complex Litigation Panel, Commercial Panel, and the Employment Arbitration and Mediation Panels of the International Institute for Conflict Prevention and Resolution (CPR) and the American Arbitration Association.  He also is a panelist on the CPR / China Council for the Promotion of International Trade U.S.-China Mediation Panel and has been an arbitrator in the Merrill Lynch class action and the Dalkon Shield cases.  He has been in Best Lawyers in America since 1994 and Chambers USA since 2003. 

Phillips is a fellow in the American College of Trial Lawyers, College of Commercial Arbitrators, and College of Labor and Employment Lawyers, as well as a distinguished fellow of the International Academy of Mediators.  He was a member of the Advisory Committee of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Missouri that drafted and implemented the innovative court-annexed Early Assessment Program in 1992 and he is a member of the Missouri Supreme Court's Commission on Alternative Dispute Resolution.  He is chair-elect of the Council of the ABA Dispute Resolution Section and has been chair of the Missouri Bar Committee on Alternative Dispute Resolution and a member of the Missouri Supreme Court Committee on Alternative Dispute Resolution.  He has been a frequent speaker on ADR training programs and has been on the faculty of both the ABA Dispute Resolution Arbitration and Mediation Institutes.  He was co-author and director of the ABA video “Mediation Madness” and the ABA Advanced Arbitration Training Institute video “Advanced Arbitration:  20/20.”  He received both his BS and JD degrees, cum laude, from the University of Missouri.


Judith Welch Wegner

Judith Welch Wegner
Burton Craige Professor of Law
University of North Carolina School of Law

Judith Wegner is a long-time member of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (UNC) School of Law faculty.  She has taught and written in the areas of legal education, land use, property law, state and local government law, and the rights of disabled persons.  She served as UNC’s dean from 1989 to 1999, after serving for eight years as a member of the faculty and for two years as associate dean.  From 1999-2001, she was a senior scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and she is a co-author of Educating Lawyers: Preparation for the Profession of Law, the Foundation’s study of legal education (commonly known as the “Carnegie Report”).  Wegner was president of the Association of American Law Schools in 1995 and has served on the national executive committee of the Order of the Coif.  She recently served as chair of the faculty for UNC-Chapel Hill and as chair of the UNC (System) Faculty Assembly.

Following graduation from law school, Wegner served as law clerk to U.S. District Judge Warren J. Ferguson (then of the Central District of California and later of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals).  She then was an attorney-adviser in the Office of Legal Counsel and an appellate attorney in the Lands and Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice.  She also was special assistant to U.S. Secretary of Education Shirley M. Hufstedler.  She visited at the University of Iowa College of Law before joining the UNC faculty in 1981.  She received her BA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1972 and her JD from UCLA in 1976. 


University of Missouri Hosts

Melody Daily

Melody R. Daily
Clinical Professor of Law
Director, Research & Writing Program,
Director, Externship Program
University of Missouri School of Law

Melody Daily teaches legal research & writing, advocacy & research, education law, and law & literature. Through the Externship Program, she has supervised more than 500 law student externs, who have provided 50,000 hours of unpaid work for judges, federal and state government agencies, public defenders, prosecuting attorneys, and public interest organizations. She has taught six summer programs for CLEO (Council on Legal Education Opportunity) hosted by the University of Missouri School of Law.  She is the 2010 recipient of the Loyd E. Roberts Memorial Prize in the Administration of Justice Award.

Daily has served on the editorial board for the Journal of the Missouri Bar since 1996 and on the editorial board of Legal Education and Rhetoric: JAWLD since 2005.  She regularly presents programs on legal writing at regional and national conferences.  Before attending law school, she taught English composition to high school and university students.  After law school, she practiced law in Glasgow, Mo.   She received her BA and MA degrees in English, and JD from the University of Missouri.


John Lande

John Lande
Isidor Loeb Professor of Law
Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution
University of Missouri School of Law

John Lande’s work focuses on various aspects of dispute resolution, dispute system design, and legal education.  He has written about how lawyering and mediation practices transform each other, business lawyers’ and executives’ opinions about litigation and ADR, designing court-connected mediation programs, improving the quality of mediation practice, the “vanishing trial,” planned early negotiation, and improving practical training of law students.  He is a co-founder and member of the executive committee of the Legal Education, ADR, and Problem-Solving (LEAPS) Project of the ABA Section of Dispute Resolution.   He publishedTeaching Students to Negotiate Like a Lawyer,” 39 Washington University Journal of Law & Policy (forthcoming 2012), which is based on his book, Lawyering with Planned Early Negotiation:  How You Can Get Good Results for Clients and Make Money (2011).

Lande joined the Missouri faculty in 2000.  Before coming to MU, he was director of the Mediation Program and assistant professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock School of Law, on the faculty at Nova Southeastern University, and a fellow in residence at the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School.  He began mediating professionally in 1982 in California.  He received an AB with high distinction from the University of Michigan, JD from the University of California at Hastings, and PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


S. David Mitchell

S. David Mitchell
Associate Professor
University of Missouri School of Law

S. David Mitchell is an interdisciplinary scholar whose work combines his training as a legal scholar and sociologist. His scholarship focuses on criminal law and he teaches Torts, Advanced Torts, Criminal Justice Administration, Law & Society, and Collateral Consequences of Sentencing. He has experience providing education at various levels and has been honored for his teaching. At MU, he received the Gold Chalk Award which recognized his outstanding teaching. Before joining the Missouri faculty, he taught history at his high school alma mater. He also served as a Scholar in Residence in the University of Colorado at Boulder Sociology Department, where he received the Alpha Kappa Delta Award for excellence in teaching and service to students. He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Columbia Montessori School.

He earned a BA in Sociology and Political Science from Brown University and attended the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his JD and MA in Sociology, and where he expects to earn his doctorate soon. After graduating from law school, he served as a law clerk in the District Court of Maryland for the Honorable Andre M. Davis. He recently served as a Faculty Fellow with the Missouri Supreme Court, researching ex-offender reentry in Missouri.


Rigel C. Oliveri

Rigel C. Oliveri
Associate Professor of Law
Associate Dean for Faculty Research and Development
University of Missouri School of Law

Rigel Oliveri served as a trial attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice through the Honors Graduate Program.  She practiced in the Civil Rights Division, Housing and Civil Enforcement Section. She litigated a number of significant cases involving housing discrimination and sexual harassment in housing and was awarded a Special Commendation from the Attorney General for outstanding service.  Her scholarship focuses on housing discrimination, residential segregation, and sexual harassment and has appeared in the Stanford Law Review, the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, and the Vanderbilt Law Review, among other journals.  She teaches fair housing, employment discrimination, civil procedure, and pretrial litigation.

Oliveri received a BA with highest distinction from the University of Virginia.  She attended Stanford Law School, where she was an articles editor for the Stanford Law Review and was elected to the Order of the Coif.  She clerked for the Honorable Stephanie K. Seymour of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, in Tulsa, Okla.