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For a complete list of acquisitions for a particular week, please select a link from the list below. Full monthly listings can be found in the Acquisitions List Archive.

MU Law Acquisitions Lists

January/February Acquisitions

Selective Listing of Recent Acquisitions

The Eternal Criminal Record

by James B. Jacobs, Harvard University Press, 2015

For over sixty million Americans, possessing a criminal record overshadows everything else about their public identity. A rap sheet, or even a court appearance or background report that reveals a run-in with the law, can have fateful consequences for a person’s interactions with just about everyone else. The Eternal Criminal Record makes transparent a pervasive system of police databases and identity screening that has become a routine feature of American life.

The United States is unique in making criminal information easy to obtain by employers, landlords, neighbors, even cyberstalkers. Its nationally integrated rap-sheet system is second to none as an effective law enforcement tool, but it has also facilitated the transfer of ever more sensitive information into the public domain. While there are good reasons for a person’s criminal past to be public knowledge, records of arrests that fail to result in convictions are of questionable benefit. Simply by placing someone under arrest, a police officer has the power to tag a person with a legal history that effectively incriminates him or her for life.

In James Jacobs’s view, law-abiding citizens have a right to know when individuals in their community or workplace represent a potential threat. But convicted persons have rights, too. Jacobs closely examines the problems created by erroneous record keeping, critiques the way the records of individuals who go years without a new conviction are expunged, and proposes strategies for eliminating discrimination based on criminal history, such as certifying the records of those who have demonstrated their rehabilitation.

How Policy Shapes Politics: Rights, Courts, Litigation, and the Struggle Over Injury Compensation

by Jeb Barnes and Thomas F. Burke, Oxford University Press, 2015

Judicialization, juridification, legalization-whatever terms they use, scholars, commentators and citizens are fascinated by what one book has called "The Global Rise of Judicial Power" and seek to understand its implications for politics and society. In How Policy Shapes Politics, Jeb Barnes and Thomas F. Burke find that the turn to courts, litigation, and legal rights can have powerful political consequences.

Barnes and Burke analyze the field of injury compensation in the United States, in which judicialized policies operate side-by-side with bureaucratized social insurance programs. They conclude that litigation, by dividing social interests into victims and villains, winners and losers, generates a fractious, chaotic politics in which even seeming allies-business and professional groups on one side, injured victims on the other-can become divided amongst themselves. By contrast, social insurance programs that compensate for injury bring social interests together, narrowing the scope of conflict and over time producing a more technocratic politics.

Policy does, in fact, create politics. But only by comparing the political trajectories of different types of policies -- some more court-centered, others less so -- can we understand the consequences of arguably one of the most significant developments in post-World War II government, the increasingly prominent role of courts, litigation, and legal rights in politics.

Why Not Jail?: Industrial Catastrophes, Corporate Malfeasance, and Government Inaction

by Rena Steinzor, Cambridge University Press, 2014

The U.S. Department of Justice is under fire for failing to prosecute banks that caused the 2008 economic meltdown because they are too big to jail. Prosecutors have long neglected to hold corporate executives accountable for chronic mistakes that kill and injure workers and customers.

This book, the first of its kind, analyzes five industrial catastrophes that have killed or sickened consumers and workers or caused irrevocable harm to the environment. From the Texas City refinery explosion to the Upper Big Branch mine collapse to the destruction of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig and extending to incidents of food and drug contamination that have killed or injured hundreds, the root causes of these preventable disasters include crimes of commission and omission. Although federal prosecutors have made a start on holding low-level managers liable, far more aggressive prosecution is appropriate as a matter of law, policy, and justice. Written in accessible and jargon-free language, this book recommends innovative interpretations of existing laws to elevate the prosecution of white-collar crime at the federal and state levels.

Sugar and the Making of International Trade Law

by Michael Fakhri, Cambridge University Press, 2014

This book traces the changing meanings of free trade over the past century through three sugar treaties and their concomitant institutions. The 1902 Brussels Convention is an example of how free trade buttressed the British Empire. The 1937 International Sugar Agreement is a story of how a group of Cubans renegotiated their state's colonial relationship with the US through free trade doctrine and the League of Nations. And the study of the 1977 International Sugar Agreement maps the world of international trade law through a plethora of institutions such as the ITO, UNCTAD, GATT and international commodity agreements – all against the backdrop of competing Third World agendas. Through a legal study of free trade ideas, interests and institutions, this book highlights how the line between the state and market, domestic and international, and public and private is always a matter of contest.

Unifying the Nation: Article IV of the United States Constitution

by Joseph F. Zimmerman, State University of New York Press, 2015

While there is a vast amount of scholarship on the US Constitution, very little of it addresses Article IV. The article’s first section, the Full Faith and Credit Clause, requires that individual states must respect “the public acts, accords, and judicial proceedings of every other state,” and the second section, the Privileges and Immunity Clause, prevents one state from treating the citizens of another state in a discriminatory manner.

In Unifying the Nation, Joseph F. Zimmerman provides a unique and comprehensive examination of court cases pertaining to both sections. Article IV, he argues, is central to the political and economic union of the individual states that comprise the nation. Many of the court cases cited in the text have tremendous day-to-day relevance and implications for the practice of government, such as same-sex marriage, child adoption, child support, public welfare, health care, and telecommunications.

A Legal History of the Civil War and Reconstruction: A Nation of Rights

by Laura F. Edwards, Cambridge University Press, 2015

Although hundreds of thousands of people died fighting in the Civil War, perhaps the war's biggest casualty was the nation's legal order. A Nation of Rights explores the implications of this major change by bringing legal history into dialogue with the scholarship of other historical fields. Federal policy on slavery and race, particularly the three Reconstruction amendments, are the best-known legal innovations of the era. Change, however, permeated all levels of the legal system, altering Americans' relationship to the law and allowing them to move popular conceptions of justice into the ambit of government policy. The results linked Americans to the nation through individual rights, which were extended to more people and, as a result of new claims, were reimagined to cover a wider array of issues. But rights had limits in what they could accomplish, particularly when it came to the collective goals that so many ordinary Americans advocated. Ultimately, Laura F. Edwards argues that this new nation of rights offered up promises that would prove difficult to sustain.

Toward a New Federal Law on Arbitration

by Thomas E. Carbonneau, Oxford University Press, 2014

Enacted as a special interest bill in 1925, the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) positioned arbitration well among specialized merchant communities. Its principles relating to the legitimacy of arbitration contracts and the limited judicial supervision of arbitral awards laid the foundation for a more detailed and effective legal regulation of arbitration. Despite the advanced character of its original content, the FAA was never significantly updated by the U.S. Congress, and the standing statutory provisions did not take into account the widening scope of arbitral jurisdiction and its revolutionary impact upon adjudicatory due process. Thus, the task of adjusting the statute to new realities became the responsibility of the U. S. Supreme Court, exercising its duty over a half century and more than fifty cases with the ultimate goal to fulfill the expectations of U.S. citizenship and protect U.S. interests in global commerce.

Toward a New Federal Law on Arbitration endeavors to repair the long-standing problem of updating the official text of the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA). In this book, Thomas E. Carbonneau proposes to transform the FAA into a genuine national law of arbitration, based exclusively on the federal rules applicable to arbitration. He argues for necessary change in the federal law of arbitration that will not only benefit commercial interests and the U.S. economy, but also provide protection for smaller individual interests, such as consumers and employees. This book joins the U.S. Supreme Court in proclaiming that judicial litigation is flawed. In the process, this book describes the current federal law on arbitration, provides and explains the provisions of the proposed law, while setting the stage for future adjudicatory practice.

Risk Management in Social Work: Preventing Professional Malpractice, Liability, and Disciplinary Action

by Frederic G. Reamer, Columbia University Press, 2014

This new text is based on Frederic G. Reamer's key reference for practitioners, Social Work Malpractice and Liability: Strategies for Prevention. Rooted in his own experiences as an expert witness in court and licensing board cases, the volume introduces the concepts of negligence, malpractice, and liability before turning to the subject of risk management. Reflecting on recent legal cases and research, Reamer identifies a variety of problems in the social work field relating to privacy and confidentiality, improper treatment and delivery of services, impaired practitioners, supervision, consultations and referrals, fraud and deception, and termination of service. He also explores the unprecedented ethical challenges created by new digital technologies--such as online counseling, video counseling, and practitioners' use of social networks and social media--and describes current issues relating to HIPAA compliance and access to electronic health records (EHR) and health information exchanges (HIE).He concludes with practical suggestions for social workers named as defendants in lawsuits and respondents in licensing board complaints.