MAALL 2009 Conference

Program Descriptions

Thursday, October 15

A-1: Famous Trials Digital Collection

  • Speaker: Douglas O. Linder, Elmer Powell Peer Professor, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law;
  • Commentator: Stephen D. Easton, Dean, University of Wyoming College of Law
  • Moderator: Randy Diamond, Director of Library and Technology Resources, University of Missouri Law School

This program continues the topic of Dean Easton's keynote. Professor Linder is a nationally recognized expert on historic trials. His Famous Trials website, the Web's largest and most visited collection of original essays, images, and primary documents pertaining to great trials, has been an ongoing project of Professor Linder's since 1996. Learn how Professor Linder assembled this treasure trove of historical trial materials and about its applications in legal education and elsewhere.

A-2: Automating the Selection, Acquisitions, and Cataloging Functions Using YBPs GOBI System

  • Speakers: Beverley Geer, Collection Development Manager YBP Library Services & J.A. Majors Company (Baker & Taylor Companies); Courtney Selby, Collection Development/Instructional Services Law Librarian, University of Tulsa Mabee Legal Information Center; Kathy Broad, Systems Librarian, Oklahoma City University Law Library
  • Moderator: Karen Kalnins, Reference Librarian, Oklahoma City University Law Library

While many law libraries have begun utilizing YBP's GOBI system to accomplish selection and acquisition, fewer have implemented procedures by which records are processed into the library's catalog. This program will address the implementation of the system to accomplish the selection, acquisition and cataloging functions.

A-3: Filling the Gap: Teaching Research of International Commercial Arbitration Issues

  • Speakers: S.I. Strong, Associate Professor, University of Missouri School of Law; Darla Jackson, Head of Reference and Access Services, Oklahoma City University Law Library

Professor Strong, author of Research and Practice in International Commercial Arbitration: Sources and Strategies (Oxford University Press), and Darla Jackson, who teaches a section of Advanced Legal Research on International Commercial Arbitration, will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of International Commercial Arbitration as a dispute resolution mechanism and strategies for research of ICA issues.

A-4: Technology Generation Gap in the Legal Workplace

  • Speaker: Elizabeth Cavendish, Librarian Relations Consultant, LexisNexis TM

A national survey, conducted by LexisNexis WorldOne Research, found that while technology is widely embraced among the 250 legal professionals surveyed, significant gaps exist among generations regarding its use and application in the workplace. The survey found "generational differences in the effect of technology on workplace etiquette, the blurring boundaries between personal and professional tasks, and the impact of technology overload." The survey examined technology and software usage among generations of legal professionals, including Boomers (identified as individuals age 44-60), Generation X (indentified as individuals age 29-43) and Generation Y (identified as individuals age 28 and younger). This program will discuss the survey results and some potential solutions identified by LexisNexis to assist managers attempting to bridge the generational gap.

B-1: Hein and the COUNTER Initiative

  • Speaker: Richard Spinelli, Senior Vice-President, William S. Hein and Co., Inc.

W.S. Hein & Co. has added significant new resources to HeinOnline content. Dick Spinelli will summarize information regarding these new resources. He will also discuss the work Hein has accomplished towards COUNTER compliance and the types of usage information that is available to subscribing institutions.

B-2: Knowledge Management Tools

  • Speaker: Janet McKinney, AALL Executive Board Member and Knowledge Management Librarian, Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP

Legal knowledge management products, including WestKM and Lexis TotalSearch, have traditionally been used in the law firm environment. However, the concept of knowledge management is expanding into other environments and the applications available for implementing KM have broadened greatly. This program will address KM applications currently available.

B-3: LIPA: Showing the Way In Legal Information Preservation

  • Speaker: Margaret K. Maes, Executive Director, Legal Information Preservation Alliance

Interested in the preservation of legal information? The Legal Information Preservation Alliance is a consortium of law libraries working to preserve print and digital legal information. Learn about LIPA's history, current initiatives, and how you can make a difference in the effort to preserve our legal heritage.

C-1: Gale Digital Collections: "Reliving Law - Reliving History"

  • Speaker: Vince Vessalo, Director of Gale Digital Archives

Gale, the world's leading provider of digitized primary source content solutions, is pleased to show how in the modern world of legal publishing and scholarship, research and teaching, the past truly does matter to the present. From the Trial of King Charles I, to Plessey, to Oscar Wilde, the law has shaped history, and the world we know innumerous ways. Spend 45 minutes with us, as we walk you through the largest collections of Treatises, Trials, Briefs, Newspapers, and Periodicals digitized and made electronically available ever conceived. Let us show you not just how you can look up a famous trial, but how to quickly and effectively navigate through the newspapers of the day reporting on the case, the briefs presented, the treatise on how it shaped and changed the law to come. Come relive history!

C-2: Developing a Teaching Philosophy

  • Speaker: Michelle Cecil, William H. Pittman Professor of Law, University of Missouri School of Law

The process of developing a teaching philosophy can be an intimidating task. Yet learning theorists argue that people will not be effective teachers until they reflect on, and commit to paper, a statement of their teaching philosophy. In this session, we will discuss a variety of possible teaching objectives, as well as ideas for how to achieve them. By the end of the session, attendees will leave with an outline of their own teaching philosophies, which they can reflect on and refine over time.

C-3: Implementing an Open Source Library System

  • Speaker: Amy Crump, Director, Marshall Public Library, Marshall, Missouri

Given both the economy and the state of library budgets, there is a lot of buzz these days regarding open source integrated library systems. Many libraries are moving away from proprietary integrated library systems in favor of open source software. Evergreen has emerged as a widely implemented system and serves as a good example of an open source product. Amy Crump, Director of the Marshall Public Library, will discuss the Marshall Public Library staff's experience with Evergreen implementation.

Friday, October 16

D-1: Women of the Missouri State Supreme Court: Words of Experience

  • Speakers: Judge Mary R. Russell, Missouri Supreme Court; Judge Ann Covington, former Chief Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court
  • Moderator: Ann Fessenden, Circuit Librarian, U.S. Court of Appeals 8th Circuit Library

In this program Missouri Supreme Court Judge Mary R. Russell and former Chief Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court Judge Ann Covington will share their experiences on the bench and answer questions about their careers.

D-3: Workshop - Copyright in Higher Education Developments and Trends

  • Speaker: Kevin Smith, JD and MLS, Scholarly Communications Officer, Duke University
  • Moderator: Randy Diamond, Director of Library and Technology Resources, University of Missouri Law School

"Fair use, the state of play" considers the current state of law and practice around fair use in higher education.

E-1: An Inside Look at State of Oklahoma v. Terry Nichols: Justice Denied or Justice Done?

  • Speaker: Rodney J. Uphoff, Elwood L. Thomas Missouri Endowed Professor of Law, University of Missouri School of Law and Director of the University of Missouri South Africa Educational Program

Professor Uphoff was one of the attorneys appointed to represent Terry Nichols in Oklahoma state court. It would not be a popular assignment, but after teaching professional responsibility for several years, Uphoff felt he had a responsibility to try to ensure that justice would be served in the Nichols case. Nichols ultimately was convicted of 160 murders based on his involvement in the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City in April 1995, but he did not receive the death penalty. Come listen to Uphoff's engaging presentation regarding his front line involvement in what has been termed one of the greatest upsets in American legal history.

E-2: Collection Decisions in Times of Shrinking Budgets

  • Speakers: Richard Amelung, Assistant Professor of Law and Acting Director of Omer Poos Law Library, Saint Louis University; Susan Goldner, Professor of Law Librarianship/Technical Services Librarian UALR/Pulaski County Law Library; Mary Kay Jung, Director Library Services, Thompson Coburn LLP
  • Moderator: Marilyn Nicely, Head of Technical Services, University of Oklahoma, Donald E. Pray Law Library

Shrinking budgets and the availability of resources in a variety of formats have further complicated already difficult collection development decisions. The presenters will discuss the collection decisions they have faced in academic and firm libraries and the factors which influenced these decisions. The presenters will also solicit comment from program participants. Further the program will provide an overview of the direction that MAALL regional libraries have taken in regards to collection decisions. Topics of discussion will include continued collection of periodicals in both print and electronic formats, changing of emphasis from number of resources to services provided with resources, consideration of the collection of monographs in an electronic format and on-demand basis, initiatives to assist in information discovery, and opportunities for obtaining support from other law libraries.

E-3: ADR for Law Library Administrators and Staff

  • Speaker: Paul Ladehoff, Center for Study of Dispute Resolution, University of Missouri School of Law and Campus Mediation Service, University of Missouri

Paul Ladehoff, the training coordinator for The Center for the Study of Dispute Resolution at University of Missouri, will facilitate a program on dispute resolution in law library environments. Participants will discover their own preferences for responding to conflict and participate in a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of particular responses in specific situations. Referencing works such as Designing Conflict Management Systems, the facilitator will conclude the session by addressing the process for establishing effective conflict management systems in various law library environments.

E-4: Copyright Workshop (continues)

  • Speaker: Kevin Smith, JD and MLS, Scholarly Communications Officer, Duke University
  • Moderator: Randy Diamond, Director of Library and Technology Resources, University of Missouri Law School

"Copyright & Licensing Applications" examines routine and more challenging problems with course management systems (both E-reserves and "transmissions" under the TEACH Act) and performances of all types on campus.

F-1: Show Me the Money: "CI to Eye" with Your Marketing Patrons to Assess Needs, Apply their Insight to Your Future Strategies and Determine the Value of Your Research!

  • Speakers: Tom Duggan , Librarian Relations Manager, West, a Thomson Reuters Business; Thomas E. Everitt, RFP/Business Development Manager, Shook Hardy & Bacon; Mary Kay Jung, Director of Library Services, Thompson Coburn LLP
  • Moderator: Tom Duggan , Librarian Relations Manager, West, a Thomson Reuters Business

Competitive Intelligence is a buzzword embraced by the law librarian industry in the last decade. However, have we as a group really identified how our research and hard work is paying off? Are our marketing patrons finding it worthwhile or can we refine our services even more? Find out firsthand from professionals in the field, including a large Midwest law firm business development manager, a large law firm librarian managing a strong competitive intelligence research practice, and a business and company background information provider representative who will share insights from a vendor perspective as to where the industry is headed.

F-2: The Next Big Thing: Empirical Legal Research?

  • Speakers: Rafael Gely, James E. Campbell Endowed Professor of Law, University of Missouri School of Law; Susan Goldner, Professor of Law Librarianship/Technical Services Librarian UALR/Pulaski County Law Library; Darla Jackson, Head of Reference and Access Services, Oklahoma City University Law Library

This program will provide an introduction to empirical research methods and assist librarians in understanding how academic law libraries can support/conduct empirical legal research initiatives. Speakers will discuss their experiences and provide advice on the types of support "average" law librarians can provide. Speakers will also suggest avenues for law librarians to develop a greater familiarity with empirical research methods.

F-3: Gathering the Documents & (Perhaps) Discovering Legislative Intent: State Legislative History Research

  • Speaker: Katherine Greene, Automation and Acquisitions Librarian, University of Kansas Wheat Law Library; Darla Jackson, Head of Reference and Access Services, Oklahoma City University Law Library; David Kullman, Reference Librarian, Saint Louis University Omer Poos Law Library
  • Moderator: Rhonda Schwartz, Assistant Professor of Law and Director at the Thormodsgard Law Library, University of North Dakota

Whether you are gathering various documents (e.g., committee reports, transcripts of hearings, entries in House or Senate Journals) to compile a legislative history or are examining the content of those documents hoping to discern "legislative intent," the process of legislative history can be compelling to those interested in examining the past (and imagining the future!). Historically, there were often few state (as opposed to federal) legislative history documents readily available to examine. Various state digitization projects, however, have helped to improve availability and accessibility. Presentations on a variety of state legislative history research processes will be followed by a general discussion.

F-4: Copyright Workshop (continues)

  • Speaker: Kevin Smith, JD and MLS, Scholarly Communications Officer, Duke University
  • Moderator: Randy Diamond, Director of Library and Technology Resources, University of Missouri Law School

Following closely on the heels of the Google Book Settlement's October 7th fairness hearing, this session presents an opportunity to review just how close we are to a comprehensive new regime for online access to U.S. books. This highly topical development provides a foundation to discuss ownership and management issues for scholarly authors.

The workshop concludes with an overview of the key issues and choices that must be made in setting copyright policy for a campus.

Saturday, October 17

G-1: Twenty Dollars a Day: Marketing Your Library in Challenging Economic Times

  • Speakers: Marcia Dority Baker, Assistant Professor of Law Library/Access Services Librarian, Schmid Law Library, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Stefanie Pearlman, Associate Professor of Law Library/Reference Librarian, Schmid Law Library, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Is it hard to market your library with limited funds and time? We will describe successful programs we have used to promote our library with little money and time. By using Twitter, a miniature golf course and candy, we have been able to bring more patrons into the library, build relationships with them and promote our collection.

G-2: Let's Talk Legal Research Instruction What we can Learn From Each Other

  • Speakers: Courtney Selby, Collection Development/Instructional Services Law Librarian, Mabee Legal Information Center, University of Tulsa College of Law; Therese A. Clarke Arado, Reference and Instructional Services Librarian and Associate Professor, David C. Shapiro Memorial Law Library, Northern Illinois University College of Law; Kathryn S. Hahn, Library Manager, Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, PC

This program will examine the various techniques law librarians in several environments use to teach legal research. Panel members will share their own experiences and also solicit experiences and ideas from other program participants.

G-3: Past, Present, and Future: Development of a Digital Project from Start to Finish (Lloyd Gaines Digital Collection)

  • Speakers: Cindy Bassett, Electronic Services Librarian and Needra Jackson, Associate Law Librarian for Collections, University of Missouri School of Law Library

Lloyd L. Gaines was denied admission to the University of Missouri School of Law in 1935 on account of his race. The University of Missouri School of Law Library has created a unique digital collection about Gaines from materials in varied physical formats and made them freely available to scholars online. This program will outline the process of creating a digital collection from start to finish as we detail the selection process, copyright issues, and the creation of metadata. We'll share triumphs, unexpected stumbling blocks, and our plans for future projects.

H-1: Business Information on the Internet

  • Speakers: Gwen Gray, Business Librarian, University of Missouri Libraries; John Dethman, Research Librarian, Coordinator Access Services, University of Missouri School of Law Library

This session will examine free internet resources for business information including corporate hierarchy, company history and viability, market data, company filings, and news sources for companies. The program will include a brief look at the CORI K-Base, a free online library of executed contracts and contract forms for a variety of transaction types and industries.

H-3: Let's Talk Legal Research Knowledge/Skill Assessment

  • Speakers: Courtney Selby, Collection Development/Instructional Services Law Librarian, Mabee Legal Information Center, University of Tulsa College of Law; Therese A. Clarke Arado, Reference and Instructional Services Librarian and Associate Professor, David C. Shapiro Memorial Law Library, Northern Illinois University College of Law

Panel members will discuss formal and informal assessment models/tools and provide the perspective of a large instructional team (6 librarians) and a smaller instructional team (2 librarians). Panel members will also solicit participant discussion regarding models/tools utilized at other institutions.

I-1: Now and into the Future - Can Library Guide Preparation Be Made Easy With LibGuides? (limited enrollment)

  • Speaker: Cindy Shearrer, Associate Law Librarian Patron Services, University of Missouri School of Law Library

Putting together a research guide with LibGuides is easy. A single guide consists of multiple content boxes contains anything from a catalog search box, an RSS feed, or a database link and more. LibGuides also allows users to create templates, populate content, and share content across different guides. Thus, while there is an investment of initial time to create content, the task of updating the guides is faster and can be shared. Additionally, LibGuides facilitates collaborative efforts between subscribing institutions. Come join us in the computer lab for this hands-on workshop using LibGuides. Limited Enrollment.